rmanyc:

Yuthog Yonten Gonpo
Central Tibet; late 17th century
Pigments on cloth
Rubin Museum of Art
Gift of Shelley and Donald Rubin
C2006.66.176 (HAR 185)
fashionsfromhistory:

Married Woman’s Ensemble
Late 19th Century to Early 20th Century
Halh People, Mongolia
VCM

fashionsfromhistory:

Married Woman’s Ensemble

Late 19th Century to Early 20th Century

Halh People, Mongolia

VCM

ancientpeoples:

Ivory panel 
Ivory panels were extensively used in the Assyrian Period to show power. Most panels were covered with gold leaf after. This panel shows a warrior carrying a lotus stem. 
Mesopotamia, Neo-Assyrian Period, 8th century BC. 
Found in Nimrud. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Ivory panel 

Ivory panels were extensively used in the Assyrian Period to show power. Most panels were covered with gold leaf after. This panel shows a warrior carrying a lotus stem. 

Mesopotamia, Neo-Assyrian Period, 8th century BC. 

Found in Nimrud. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

nyankee asked: I just wanted to stop in and say how legitimately excited I am for you, and say "congratulations" on your program admission! It's always awesome to see people I look up to/have been following for a long time achieve things they really want, and I can't wait to see how things go for you! :)

Thank you so much! I really appreciate it. 

Comedy and Buddhism: A Four-Part Workshop

rmanyc:

It’s Funny Because It’s True: Exploring the Buddhist Truth of Suffering through Comedy w/ Christopher Kelly

Wednesdays; May 7 - 28 

6:00 - 8:00pm

image

Humor helps us to confront the awkward fact that suffering, referred to as “dukkha” by Buddhists, is unavoidable in life. By identifying the causes of suffering you can transform them into powerful tools for insight, joy, and laughter. 

For more information or to register you can go here!

japaneseaesthetics:

haruenishikawa:

Jimbaori (samurai battlefield vest) Edo period, 17th century Hand applied feathers, silk, and fabric H: 31-1/2 x W: 28-1/3 in. (80 x 72 cm) Leighton Longhi Inc. Oriental Fine Art

This vest is adorned with over 1,000 pheasant feathers from species indigenous to Japan, including the Green Pheasant, and features a bird’s-eye design on its back. 

japaneseaesthetics:

haruenishikawa:

Jimbaori (samurai battlefield vest)
Edo period, 17th century
Hand applied feathers, silk, and fabric
H: 31-1/2 x W: 28-1/3 in. (80 x 72 cm)
Leighton Longhi Inc. Oriental Fine Art

This vest is adorned with over 1,000 pheasant feathers from species indigenous to Japan, including the Green Pheasant, and features a bird’s-eye design on its back. 

Anonymous asked: I'm currently a high school student and I certainly appreciate this blog. It's nice to learn new things about Asia since the high school curriculum completely ignores the whole continent of Asia unless it has something to do with the wars. But those get boring as it's the same things every year. It's nice to see things relating to religion, different eras, and artifacts. So I'd like to thank you just for doing this out of your own interest.

Thank you! High schools unfortunately have to (at least in the US) deal with some pretty aggravating standardized tests which can unfortunately get in the way of learning. 

School can impart many valuable things, but it can also be very limiting in its structure, so I encourage everyone who finds what they enjoy learning to pursue that. 

Anonymous asked: This may be random but I want your opinion. The question is where do you place Russia in historical context? It is a confusing country to place in history because it spans the Eurasian steppe. Do you think it is European, Asian, or really its own place?

themuseologist:

honeyballslecter:

asianhistory:

The very big secret is that there is absolutely no proper delineation between Asia and Europe. Geographically it is simply “Eurasia.” 

The lines we use to divide between West and East are flimsy at best - political or cultural, in many cases Imperialist or Orientalist - and people accept these borders. There are differences between China and Norway, of course — but there is no singular latitude and longitude where the continent changes drastically or radically from one thing to the next.  

With history, we treat things in contexts - social, political, cultural, geographic, etc. A vast amount of historians treat Russia through a “European” or “Western” context - which is no more right or wrong than the alternative. Much of Russia’s population and politics has intersected with the rest of what is thought to be Europe. The only treatment of Russia that would be relevant for this blog would be a treatment of Russia in the context of “Asia” and not “Europe”.

I hope that makes sense!

Wait, wasn’t the European part of Russia delimited at the Ural mountains? That’s what they taught is in school, did that go up in smoke like Yugoslavia or what?

It’s not wrong. It’s just that there is no “real” dividing line between Europe and Asia. The dividing lines between Asia and Europe are more of an ideological construct than a real, physical place. (Meaning a society/group of people has agreed on a particular idea or meaning that guides how they think, react, and frame the world. Gender roles are an ideology, for example.)

Let me recontextualize this just in terms of geography, not politics: The United States of America also has a large mountain range, known as the Rockies. The Rocky Mountains extend for more than 3,000 miles (4,800 km), and their highest peak is (14,431 ft/4,399 m). 

The Ural Mountains extend for 2500 km (about a little more than half the range of the Rockies), and its highest peak registers at about 1,895 m (6,217 ft) which is under half the highest peak of the Rockies. 

By all geographic measures, the Rocky mountains are bigger than the Ural mountains, they are longer than the Ural mountains. And yet no one has ever suggested that California resides on a different continent from New York. Because it doesn’t. California may touch another tectonic plate, but it’s still part of the same contiguous landmass. 

The conventions of what continents are - are just that. They’re conventions. Some divide by Eurasia, and some say there is Asia and Europe. In either case, the use of either location for Russia is correct, but people use different words and conventions to explain the same thing in different contexts, or historical lenses. 

The Ural mountains are just mountains. They don’t really create a socio-political / historic border. People do that. 

Whoops. Blogged my response to the wrong place. 

Anonymous asked: This may be random but I want your opinion. The question is where do you place Russia in historical context? It is a confusing country to place in history because it spans the Eurasian steppe. Do you think it is European, Asian, or really its own place?

The very big secret is that there is absolutely no proper delineation between Asia and Europe. Geographically it is simply “Eurasia.” 

The lines we use to divide between West and East are flimsy at best - political or cultural, in many cases Imperialist or Orientalist - and people accept these borders. There are differences between China and Norway, of course — but there is no singular latitude and longitude where the continent changes drastically or radically from one thing to the next.  

With history, we treat things in contexts - social, political, cultural, geographic, etc. A vast amount of historians treat Russia through a “European” or “Western” context - which is no more right or wrong than the alternative. Much of Russia’s population and politics has intersected with the rest of what is thought to be Europe. The only treatment of Russia that would be relevant for this blog would be a treatment of Russia in the context of “Asia” and not “Europe”.

I hope that makes sense!

Anonymous asked: Congratulations on your acceptance to the program! I wish you the best of luck :)

Thank you very very much! I’m absolutely thrilled that this is going to be my full time studies.