imperialjapanesearmy:

Hiromichi Shinohara, the leading IJAAS (Imperial Japanese Army Air Service) Ace. Shinohara saw his first Air Combat in May of 1939 against Soviet Forces in the Nomonhan Incident and in 3 months he shot down a staggering 58 enemy planes. In one day, Shinohara shot down 11 enemy fighters, this feat was only bested by the top ace of all time, German Pilot Erich Hartmann who shot down 12 in a day. Shinohara scored all his victories in his Ki-27 Fighter.  He was shot down on August 27th by multiple soviet fighters, a day in which he himself downed 3 soviet planes. While the rest of Japans leading aces claimed around 70-90 victories throughout the course of the war, Shinohara scored 58 in 3 months and could have been the most Skilled Japanese Ace of all time.

imperialjapanesearmy:

Hiromichi Shinohara, the leading IJAAS (Imperial Japanese Army Air Service) Ace. Shinohara saw his first Air Combat in May of 1939 against Soviet Forces in the Nomonhan Incident and in 3 months he shot down a staggering 58 enemy planes. In one day, Shinohara shot down 11 enemy fighters, this feat was only bested by the top ace of all time, German Pilot Erich Hartmann who shot down 12 in a day. Shinohara scored all his victories in his Ki-27 Fighter.  He was shot down on August 27th by multiple soviet fighters, a day in which he himself downed 3 soviet planes. While the rest of Japans leading aces claimed around 70-90 victories throughout the course of the war, Shinohara scored 58 in 3 months and could have been the most Skilled Japanese Ace of all time.

(via imperialjapanesehistory)

daavenrey asked: My great grandfather was in the Bataan death march. He was captured by the Japanese when they invaded his village. He worked with the guerillas to aid the Americans. He left my grandfather (13 at the time) alone to take care of his 10 siblings and mother. She died during the war and so my grandpa took care of all of them. (Quitting school, finding food, and joining the guerillas as well.) The Japanese came and he stabbed a Japanese soldier with a bayonet to save an American's life. 13 years old!

On my mom’s side of the family, my great grandpa (recently died at 100), was the head of the town. They owned lots pigs and cows. The Japanese would come by the town market to make deals. He traded w/ the Japanese. (Or else obviously, you get shot) & he also needed money to feed his family of course, during WWII. The town thought he was a traitor & spy for the Japanese army because of this. So they were going to execute him, b/c he also was in the guerillas. But luckily he was a distant relative.

Those are amazing stories, thanks for sharing!

imperialjapanesehistory:

Michitsura Nozu (Nozu Michitsura) (17 December 1840 - 18 October 1908), was a Japanese field marshal and leading figure in the early Imperial Japanese Army.Born in Kagoshima as the son of a samurai of the Satsuma domain, he took part in the Boshin War. In 1871, he was appointed an army major, and later fought against his former colleagues in the Satsuma Rebellion. In 1878, he became commander of the Tokyo military district. Together with War Minister Oyama Iwao, he visited Europe to examine the military systems of various European nations. On returning to Japan, he was appointed commander of the Hiroshima military district and promoted to general in 1894.During the First Sino-Japanese War he led the Hiroshima Division at the Battle of Pyongyang (1894). He succeeded General Yamagata Aritomo as command-in-chief of the Manchurian Army, and fought in that capacity throughout the remainder of the war. Afterwards, he successively held various military posts including Commander of the Imperial Guard Division, Inspector-General of Military Training, and Military Councillor.For his services, Emperor Meiji granted him the rank of viscount in 1895. Nozu commanded the Japanese Fourth Army in the Russo-Japanese War, and was promoted to field marshal in 1906. His title was also upgraded to koshaku(marquis) in 1906.His decorations included the Order of the Golden Kite (1st class) and the Grand Cordon of the Supreme Order of the Chrysanthemum.He died in 1908

imperialjapanesehistory:

Michitsura Nozu (Nozu Michitsura) (17 December 1840 - 18 October 1908), was a Japanese field marshal and leading figure in the early Imperial Japanese Army.

Born in Kagoshima as the son of a samurai of the Satsuma domain, he took part in the Boshin War. In 1871, he was appointed an army major, and later fought against his former colleagues in the Satsuma Rebellion. In 1878, he became commander of the Tokyo military district. Together with War Minister Oyama Iwao, he visited Europe to examine the military systems of various European nations. On returning to Japan, he was appointed commander of the Hiroshima military district and promoted to general in 1894.

During the First Sino-Japanese War he led the Hiroshima Division at the Battle of Pyongyang (1894). He succeeded General Yamagata Aritomo as command-in-chief of the Manchurian Army, and fought in that capacity throughout the remainder of the war. Afterwards, he successively held various military posts including Commander of the Imperial Guard Division, Inspector-General of Military Training, and Military Councillor.

For his services, Emperor Meiji granted him the rank of viscount in 1895. Nozu commanded the Japanese Fourth Army in the Russo-Japanese War, and was promoted to field marshal in 1906. His title was also upgraded to koshaku(marquis) in 1906.

His decorations included the Order of the Golden Kite (1st class) and the Grand Cordon of the Supreme Order of the Chrysanthemum.

He died in 1908

imperialjapanesehistory:

Japanese marines in Chinese Shanghai 1937

imperialjapanesehistory:

Japanese marines in Chinese Shanghai 1937

(Source: splashman.phoenix.wikispaces.net)

imperialjapanesehistory:

Maresuke Nogi (Nogi Maresuke), also known as Kiten, Count Nogi, (25 December 1849 - 13 September 1912) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army, and a prominent figure in the Russo-Japanese War.Early lifeNogi was born as the son of a samurai at the Edo residence (present day Tokyo, of the Chōfu clan from Choshu (present day Yamaguchi Prefecture. He was born on 11 November 1849, according to the old Japanese lunar calendar, or Christmas day, according to the new one. His childhood name was Mujin, literally “no one”, to prevent evil spirits from coming to harm him. On turning 18, he was renamed Nogi Bunzō.Early Military CareerIn November 1869, by the order of the Nagato domain’s lord, he enlisted in Fushimi Goshin Heisha (lit. the Fushimi Loyal Guard Barrack) to be trained in the French style for the domainal Army. After completing the training, he was reassigned to the Kawatō Barrack in Kyoto as an instructor, and then as Toyōra domain’s Army trainer in charge of coastal defense troops.In 1871, Nogi was commissioned as a major in the fledgling Imperial Japanese Army. Around this time, he renamed himself Maresuke taking a kanji from the name of his father. In 1875, he became the 14th Infantry Regiment’s attaché, and for his service in the Satsuma Rebellion, against the forces of Saigo Takamori in Kyūshū, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel. In a fierce battle at that time, he lost the 14th Infantry Regiment’s regimental banner to the enemy, which was considered an extreme disgrace. Nogi considered this such a grave mistake that he listed it as one of the reasons for his later suicide.The next year (1876), Nogi was named as the Kumamoto regional troop’s Staff Officer, and transferred to command the 1st Infantry Regiment.On 27 August 1876, Nogi married Shizuko, the fourth daughter of Satsuma samurai Yuji Sadano, who was then 20 years old. As Nogi was 28 years old, it was a very late marriage for that time, considering that the average age to marry was in the early 20s. On 28 August 1877, their first son Katsunori was born, and Nogi bought his first house at Nizakamachi, Tokyo. In 1878, he became a colonel. The next year, his second son, Yasunori, was born.In 1887, Nogi went to Germany with Kawakami Soroku to study European military strategy and tactics.In 1894, during the First Sino-Japanese War, Nogi served as major general in command of the First Infantry Brigade, which penetrated the Chinese defenses and successfuly occupied Port Arthur in only one day of combat. The following year, he was promoted to lieutenant general and assigned to the Second Infantry Brigade, tasked with the invasion of Taiwan. Nogi remained with the occupation forces in Taiwan until 1898. In 1899, he was recalled to Japan, and placed in command of the newly formed 11th Infantry Brigade, based in Kagawa.Political careerAfter the war, he was elevated to danshaku (baron) and awarded the Order of the Golden Kite (1st class).Nogi was appointed as the third Japanese Governor-General of Taiwan from 14 October 1896 to February 1898. When moving to Taiwan, he moved his entire family, and during their time in Taiwan, his mother contracted malaria and died. This led Nogi to take measures to improve on the health care infrastructure of the island.However, unlike many of his contemporary officers, Nogi expressed no interest in pursuing politics.Russo-Japanese WarNogi (center) during the Russo-Japanese War.In 1904, Nogi was recalled to active service on the occasion of the Russo-Japanese War, and was promoted to army general in command of the Japanese Third Army, with an initial strength of approximately 90,000 men and assigned to the capture of the Russia port of Port Arthur on the southern tip of Liaodong Peninsula, Manchuria. Nogi’s forces landed shortly after the Battle of Nanshan, in which his eldest son, serving with the Japanese 2nd Army, was killed. Advancing slowly down the Liaondong Peninsula, Nogi encountered unexpectedly strong resistance, and far more fortifications than he had experienced ten years earlier against the Chinese. The attack against Port Arthur quickly turned into the lengthy Siege of Port Arthur, a quagmire lasting from 1 August 1904 to 2 January 1905, costing the Japanese massive losses, including Nogi’s second son. Due to the mounting casualties and failure of Nogi to overcome Port Arthur’s defenses, there was mounting pressure within the Japanese government and military to relieve him of command. However, in an unprecedented action, Emperor Meiji spoke out during the Supreme War Council meeting, defending Nogi and demanding that he kept in command.After the fall of Port Arthur, Nogi was regarded as a national hero. He led his 3rd Army against the Russian forces at the final Battle of Mukden, ending the land combat phase of operations of the war.At the end of the war, Nogi made a report directly to Emperor Meiji during a Gozen Kaigi. When explaining battles of the Siege of Port Arthur in detail, he broke down and wept, apologizing for the 56,000 lives lost in that campaign and asking to be allowed to kill himself in atonement. Emperor Meiji told him that suicide was unacceptable, as all responsibility for the war was due to imperial orders, and that Nogi must remain alive, at least as long as he himself lived.Post War CareerAfter the war, Nogi was elevated to the title of count and awarded the Order of the Rising Sun (1st class with Paulownia Blossoms, Grand Cordon).As head of the Peers’ School from 1908-1912, he was the mentor of the young Hirohito, and was, perhaps, the most important influence on the life of the future emperor of Japan.Nogi spent most of his personal fortune on hospitals for wounded soldiers and on memorial monuments erected around the country in commemoration of those killed during the Russo-Japanese War. He also successful petitioned the Japanese government to erect a Russian-style memorial monument in Port Arthur to the Russian dead of that campaign.ScoutingGeneral Nogi is significant to Scouting in Japan, as in 1911, he went to England in attendance on Prince Higashifushimi Yorihito for the coronation of King George V. The General, as the “Defender of Port Arthur” was introduced to Lord Baden-Powell, the “Defender of Mafeking”“, by Lord Kitchener, whose expression “Once a Scout, always a Scout” remains to this day.SeppukuHouse of Maresuke Nogi.He committed seppuku shortly after the Emperor Meiji’s funeral entourage left the palace. The ritual suicide was in accordance with the samurai practice of following one’s master to death (junshi). Nogi and his spouse bathed together, and changed into white kimonos, before sharing a cup of sake before the tokonoma. He sliced his own stomach open, then slit his throat. After that, Shizuko stabbed herself in the chest. In his suicide letter, he said that he wished to expiate for his disgrace in Kyūshū, and for the thousands of casualties at Port Arthur.All four members of the Nogi family are buried at Aoyama Cemetery in Tokyo. Under State Shinto, Nogi was revered as a kami and a Shinto shrine in his honor still exists on the site of his house in Nogizaka, Tokyo.LegacyNogi’s seppuku was immediately created a sensation and a controversy. Some writers claimed that it reflected Nogi’s disgust with the profligacy and decline in moral values of late Meiji Japan. Others pointed to Nogi’s own suicide note, calling it an act of atonement for mistakes in his military career. In either case, Nogi’s suicide marked the end of an era, and it had a profound impact on contemporary writers, such as Mori Ogai and Natsume Soseki. For the public, Nogi became a symbol of loyalty and sacrifice. His deification made him a guardian of the military, but among his military contemporaries, his military reputation had always been marginal.

imperialjapanesehistory:

Maresuke Nogi (Nogi Maresuke), also known as Kiten, Count Nogi, (25 December 1849 - 13 September 1912) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army, and a prominent figure in the Russo-Japanese War.

Early life

Nogi was born as the son of a samurai at the Edo residence (present day Tokyo, of the Chōfu clan from Choshu (present day Yamaguchi Prefecture. He was born on 11 November 1849, according to the old Japanese lunar calendar, or Christmas day, according to the new one. His childhood name was Mujin, literally “no one”, to prevent evil spirits from coming to harm him. On turning 18, he was renamed Nogi Bunzō.


Early Military Career

In November 1869, by the order of the Nagato domain’s lord, he enlisted in Fushimi Goshin Heisha (lit. the Fushimi Loyal Guard Barrack) to be trained in the French style for the domainal Army. After completing the training, he was reassigned to the Kawatō Barrack in Kyoto as an instructor, and then as Toyōra domain’s Army trainer in charge of coastal defense troops.

In 1871, Nogi was commissioned as a major in the fledgling Imperial Japanese Army. Around this time, he renamed himself Maresuke taking a kanji from the name of his father. In 1875, he became the 14th Infantry Regiment’s attaché, and for his service in the Satsuma Rebellion, against the forces of Saigo Takamori in Kyūshū, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel. In a fierce battle at that time, he lost the 14th Infantry Regiment’s regimental banner to the enemy, which was considered an extreme disgrace. Nogi considered this such a grave mistake that he listed it as one of the reasons for his later suicide.

The next year (1876), Nogi was named as the Kumamoto regional troop’s Staff Officer, and transferred to command the 1st Infantry Regiment.

On 27 August 1876, Nogi married Shizuko, the fourth daughter of Satsuma samurai Yuji Sadano, who was then 20 years old. As Nogi was 28 years old, it was a very late marriage for that time, considering that the average age to marry was in the early 20s. On 28 August 1877, their first son Katsunori was born, and Nogi bought his first house at Nizakamachi, Tokyo. In 1878, he became a colonel. The next year, his second son, Yasunori, was born.

In 1887, Nogi went to Germany with Kawakami Soroku to study European military strategy and tactics.

In 1894, during the First Sino-Japanese War, Nogi served as major general in command of the First Infantry Brigade, which penetrated the Chinese defenses and successfuly occupied Port Arthur in only one day of combat. The following year, he was promoted to lieutenant general and assigned to the Second Infantry Brigade, tasked with the invasion of Taiwan. Nogi remained with the occupation forces in Taiwan until 1898. In 1899, he was recalled to Japan, and placed in command of the newly formed 11th Infantry Brigade, based in Kagawa.


Political career

After the war, he was elevated to danshaku (baron) and awarded the Order of the Golden Kite (1st class).

Nogi was appointed as the third Japanese Governor-General of Taiwan from 14 October 1896 to February 1898. When moving to Taiwan, he moved his entire family, and during their time in Taiwan, his mother contracted malaria and died. This led Nogi to take measures to improve on the health care infrastructure of the island.

However, unlike many of his contemporary officers, Nogi expressed no interest in pursuing politics.


Russo-Japanese War

Nogi (center) during the Russo-Japanese War.In 1904, Nogi was recalled to active service on the occasion of the Russo-Japanese War, and was promoted to army general in command of the Japanese Third Army, with an initial strength of approximately 90,000 men and assigned to the capture of the Russia port of Port Arthur on the southern tip of Liaodong Peninsula, Manchuria. Nogi’s forces landed shortly after the Battle of Nanshan, in which his eldest son, serving with the Japanese 2nd Army, was killed. Advancing slowly down the Liaondong Peninsula, Nogi encountered unexpectedly strong resistance, and far more fortifications than he had experienced ten years earlier against the Chinese. The attack against Port Arthur quickly turned into the lengthy Siege of Port Arthur, a quagmire lasting from 1 August 1904 to 2 January 1905, costing the Japanese massive losses, including Nogi’s second son. Due to the mounting casualties and failure of Nogi to overcome Port Arthur’s defenses, there was mounting pressure within the Japanese government and military to relieve him of command. However, in an unprecedented action, Emperor Meiji spoke out during the Supreme War Council meeting, defending Nogi and demanding that he kept in command.

After the fall of Port Arthur, Nogi was regarded as a national hero. He led his 3rd Army against the Russian forces at the final Battle of Mukden, ending the land combat phase of operations of the war.

At the end of the war, Nogi made a report directly to Emperor Meiji during a Gozen Kaigi. When explaining battles of the Siege of Port Arthur in detail, he broke down and wept, apologizing for the 56,000 lives lost in that campaign and asking to be allowed to kill himself in atonement. Emperor Meiji told him that suicide was unacceptable, as all responsibility for the war was due to imperial orders, and that Nogi must remain alive, at least as long as he himself lived.


Post War Career

After the war, Nogi was elevated to the title of count and awarded the Order of the Rising Sun (1st class with Paulownia Blossoms, Grand Cordon).

As head of the Peers’ School from 1908-1912, he was the mentor of the young Hirohito, and was, perhaps, the most important influence on the life of the future emperor of Japan.

Nogi spent most of his personal fortune on hospitals for wounded soldiers and on memorial monuments erected around the country in commemoration of those killed during the Russo-Japanese War. He also successful petitioned the Japanese government to erect a Russian-style memorial monument in Port Arthur to the Russian dead of that campaign.


Scouting

General Nogi is significant to Scouting in Japan, as in 1911, he went to England in attendance on Prince Higashifushimi Yorihito for the coronation of King George V. The General, as the “Defender of Port Arthur” was introduced to Lord Baden-Powell, the “Defender of Mafeking”“, by Lord Kitchener, whose expression “Once a Scout, always a Scout” remains to this day.


Seppuku

House of Maresuke Nogi.He committed seppuku shortly after the Emperor Meiji’s funeral entourage left the palace. The ritual suicide was in accordance with the samurai practice of following one’s master to death (junshi). Nogi and his spouse bathed together, and changed into white kimonos, before sharing a cup of sake before the tokonoma. He sliced his own stomach open, then slit his throat. After that, Shizuko stabbed herself in the chest. In his suicide letter, he said that he wished to expiate for his disgrace in Kyūshū, and for the thousands of casualties at Port Arthur.

All four members of the Nogi family are buried at Aoyama Cemetery in Tokyo. Under State Shinto, Nogi was revered as a kami and a Shinto shrine in his honor still exists on the site of his house in Nogizaka, Tokyo.


Legacy

Nogi’s seppuku was immediately created a sensation and a controversy. Some writers claimed that it reflected Nogi’s disgust with the profligacy and decline in moral values of late Meiji Japan. Others pointed to Nogi’s own suicide note, calling it an act of atonement for mistakes in his military career. In either case, Nogi’s suicide marked the end of an era, and it had a profound impact on contemporary writers, such as Mori Ogai and Natsume Soseki. For the public, Nogi became a symbol of loyalty and sacrifice. His deification made him a guardian of the military, but among his military contemporaries, his military reputation had always been marginal.

imperialjapanesehistory:

Sakae Ōba (大場 栄 Ōba Sakae?) (21 March 1914 – 8 June 1992) was an officer of the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. He served in both China and in the Pacific campaign. After Japanese forces were defeated in the Battle of Saipan, he led a group of soldiers and civilians deep into the jungle to evade capture by Allied forces. Under Ōba’s leadership, the group survived for over a year after the battle and finally surrendered in December 1945, three months after the war had ended. Following his return to Japan, he became a successful businessman and served on the city council of Gamagori, Aichi.

imperialjapanesehistory:

Sakae Ōba (大場 栄 Ōba Sakae?) (21 March 1914 – 8 June 1992) was an officer of the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. He served in both China and in the Pacific campaign. After Japanese forces were defeated in the Battle of Saipan, he led a group of soldiers and civilians deep into the jungle to evade capture by Allied forces. Under Ōba’s leadership, the group survived for over a year after the battle and finally surrendered in December 1945, three months after the war had ended. Following his return to Japan, he became a successful businessman and served on the city council of Gamagori, Aichi.

A Japanese propaganda poster for the Tripartite Pact: “Good friends in three countries”. (left Adolf Hitler, center Fumimaro Konoe, right Benito Mussolini)

A Japanese propaganda poster for the Tripartite Pact: “Good friends in three countries”. (left Adolf Hitler, center Fumimaro Konoe, right Benito Mussolini)

imperialjapanesehistory:

 
English: The Capture of a choke point, city of Anqing, Special Naval Landing Forces on the deck board of the IJN xxx, June 11th

imperialjapanesehistory:

 

English: The Capture of a choke point, city of Anqing, Special Naval Landing Forces on the deck board of the IJN xxx, June 11th


hrhleoi answered your question: Questions, Requests, Comments?
Anything on Imperial Japan?

Although I’ll post Imperial Japanese History, I also highly recommend the Imperial Japanese History blog!

fleursdartifice asked:

Hi, I’ve been trying to look up stuff on the Seediq tribe in Taiwan, specifically their experiences during the japanese occupation and then post-war. I was wondering if you know anything about this, or if you could direct me to a good link? Also, I’d like to take the time to say that I’ve been following for a while and I really like this tumblr, and thank you for creating it. =D 

 Well, you put me on a scavenger hunt for sure! Not your fault, but it doesn’t seem like there’s much that isn’t about the Wushe rebellion movie adaption coming out this year. (The trailer looks pretty great from a film only perspective, but then I do love John Woo, so there you go.) China History Forum had a discussion about the matter, but I wouldn’t say this is an academic or even accurate source since I don’t know the history myself.

The wiki entry for the Wushe incident has no sources, although I did find a website about the Chief of the Seediq, Mona Rudao and this article from Taiwan Today, this article from the Taipei Times, and this article from Erenlai Magazine. In all honesty, this seems like a fascinating subject that would be best researched further with a Librarian!

 Also, thanks!