Maoism

basedlibido:

Anti-Confucianism: Mao’s Last Campaign

Lenin, Mao, and Aidit

Mao and the Politics of Revolutionary Mortality

Mao Tse-Tung’s Materialist Dialectics

Mao Tun: The Critic (Part I)

Mao Tun: The Critic (Part II)

Marx and Lenin in China

Of Belts and Ladders: State Policy and Uneven Regional Development in Post- Mao China

Specialization of the Rural: Reinterpreting the Labor Mobility of Rural Young Women in Post-Mao China

The Dilemma of Mao Tse-tung

The Legacy of Mao Zedong

The Man Who Molded Mao: Yang Changji and the First Generation of Chinese Communists

I can’t vouch for any of these links, but they seem like they could be of interest? Has anyone downloaded these?

(via objetpunka-deactivated20130502)

Cultural Revolution

My Shanghainese parents just finished high school in 1966 when the Cultural Revolution happened. They sometimes share their experience with me, even though my mom doesn’t like to talk about it. Here are some things that stuck out for me:

  • When my dad was walking to school he saw his PE teacher jump out of one of the school’s windows. According to him, the teacher’s body landed a few feet away from him.
  • Because my parents were of the “enemy class,” their homes were ransacked. My mother remembers frantically hiding precious heirlooms in the walls with her closest friend helping her.
  • That same friend who helped my mother was very outspoken, so the Red Guards would publicly humiliate her and her family to “break her.” She was then sent far away from Shanghai in the “Down to the Countryside” Movement. My mom never saw her again.
  • My dad somehow ended up as a Red Guard; he did inventory for them. Then they found out about his class status and kicked him out.
  • Both my parents were sent to farms for “Down to the Countryside.” They were sent to Changning, an island off of Shanghai. They count themselves lucky because they weren’t sent to Sichuan or a mountain village, as life there was supposedly much harder. They stayed on the farms for 3 years before getting the chance to leave.
  • Both my parents hate the communist party for taking away everything they had (my great-grandfather was a successful business man pre-communist China who died with what would be $20 today in his pocket), but they actually like Chairman Mao. They blame the Cultural Revolution and the resulting chaos on the crazed mob mentality of Mao’s followers.
There’s not much I can give to back up these claims, as it’s mostly oral history. My father is willing to give more details about his experience, but the last time I asked my mother about it she started crying, so I decided not to press the issue.

Thank you very much for submitting this. Oral History is important, and just as necessary as “Academic” history. 

lolcreepyshit:

Jiang Qing ‘s reign of terror was from March 20, 1914 to May 14, 1991. She was the pseudonym that was used by Chinese leader Mao Zedong’s last wife and a major Communist Party of China power figure. Her stage name was Lan Ping during her acting years, and was known by various other names during her life time. She married Mao in Yan’an in November 1938 and has been referred to as Madame Mao in Western literature and served as Communist China’s first lady. She is well known for playing a major role in the cultural revolution (1966-76) and also for forming the radical political alliance known as the “gang of four”. From the 1940s on, Mao and Jiang quarreled frequently. After the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, Jiang became the nation’s first lady. She worked as Director of film in the Central Propaganda Department, and as a member of the Ministry of Culture steering committee for the film industry. An uproar in 1950 led the investigation of The Life of Wu Xun, a film about a 19th century beggar who raised money to educate the poor. Jiang supported criticism of the film for celebrating counter-revolutionary ideas.Jiang Qing was sentenced to death in 1981. In 1983, her death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment.While in prison, Jiang Qing was diagnosed with throat cancer, but she refused an operation. She was eventually released, on medical grounds, in 1991. At the hospital, Jiang Qing used the name Lǐ Rùnqīng. She was alleged to have committed suicide on May 14, 1991, aged 77, by hanging herself in a bathroom of her hospital. She reputedly wrote on her suicide note, “Chairman [Mao]! I love you! Your student and comrade is coming to see you!”. Her suicide occurred two days short of the 25th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution.She wished her remains could be buried in her home province of Shandong, but in consideration of possible future vandalism to her tomb, the state decided to have her remains moved to a safer common cemetery in Beijing. Jiang Qing is buried in Fukuda Cemetery in the western hills of Beijing. Her grave is marked by a tall white stone inscribed with her school name, not the name by which she was famously known, which reads: “Tomb of Late Mother, Lǐ Yúnhè, 1914–1991”

lolcreepyshit:

Jiang Qing ‘s reign of terror was from March 20, 1914 to May 14, 1991. She was the pseudonym that was used by Chinese leader Mao Zedong’s last wife and a major Communist Party of China power figure. Her stage name was Lan Ping during her acting years, and was known by various other names during her life time. She married Mao in Yan’an in November 1938 and has been referred to as Madame Mao in Western literature and served as Communist China’s first lady. She is well known for playing a major role in the cultural revolution (1966-76) and also for forming the radical political alliance known as the “gang of four”. From the 1940s on, Mao and Jiang quarreled frequently. After the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, Jiang became the nation’s first lady. She worked as Director of film in the Central Propaganda Department, and as a member of the Ministry of Culture steering committee for the film industry. An uproar in 1950 led the investigation of The Life of Wu Xun, a film about a 19th century beggar who raised money to educate the poor. Jiang supported criticism of the film for celebrating counter-revolutionary ideas.

Jiang Qing was sentenced to death in 1981. In 1983, her death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment.

While in prison, Jiang Qing was diagnosed with throat cancer, but she refused an operation. She was eventually released, on medical grounds, in 1991. At the hospital, Jiang Qing used the name Lǐ Rùnqīng. She was alleged to have committed suicide on May 14, 1991, aged 77, by hanging herself in a bathroom of her hospital. She reputedly wrote on her suicide note, “Chairman [Mao]! I love you! Your student and comrade is coming to see you!”. Her suicide occurred two days short of the 25th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution.

She wished her remains could be buried in her home province of Shandong, but in consideration of possible future vandalism to her tomb, the state decided to have her remains moved to a safer common cemetery in Beijing. Jiang Qing is buried in Fukuda Cemetery in the western hills of Beijing. Her grave is marked by a tall white stone inscribed with her school name, not the name by which she was famously known, which reads: “Tomb of Late Mother, Lǐ Yúnhè, 1914–1991”

(Source: valar-morghuliss, via rarelyinhistory)

Glorious Socialism: Chinese Ladies in Propaganda Posters
Irony Is Good!
How Mao killed Chinese humor … and how the Internet is slowly bringing it back again.

"Socialism is great!" Was there ever a statement riper for ironic mockery than this erstwhile catchphrase of the infant Chinese republic? How could a thinking people accept this and a host of other bald statements at face value, without so much as a raised eyebrow or a silently murmured really? And why, 60 years later, when the Chinese government calls the Dalai Lama a “devil with a human face,” do none of its citizens seem to feel the urge to giggle?
Irony, put simply, is a gap between words and their meaning, a space across which speaker and listener exchange a knowing wink. For this knowingness to be mutual, a web of common experiences and beliefs must exist, within which language adopts deeper echoes and associations. In China, however, the Communist Party has made quite clear that there is no commonality but that of the party and its people, and certainly no shared language beyond that handed down by national leaders. The Chinese government has spent decades ensuring that public discourse has remained “public” only in the sense of “government owned.”
As early as 1942, seven years before the founding of the People’s Republic, Chairman Mao was explaining to government leaders and intellectuals that the purpose of art and culture was to serve political ends. But the real damage to the Chinese language was done during the Cultural Revolution, when all music and theater were outlawed except for eight politically correct "Model Operas" and public discourse was reduced to what could be shouted through a PA system. Words were hammered flat into instruments of power and violence. Songs, in particular, were seen as effective tools. One of the most popular, “The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution,” began with this catchy intro:
The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution is good,It is good,It is good,It is good.

Read More… Via Foreign Policy.
Interesting stuff about Language, The Cultural Revolution, and Humor, of all things. I thought you might enjoy!

Irony Is Good!

How Mao killed Chinese humor … and how the Internet is slowly bringing it back again.

"Socialism is great!" Was there ever a statement riper for ironic mockery than this erstwhile catchphrase of the infant Chinese republic? How could a thinking people accept this and a host of other bald statements at face value, without so much as a raised eyebrow or a silently murmured really? And why, 60 years later, when the Chinese government calls the Dalai Lama a “devil with a human face,” do none of its citizens seem to feel the urge to giggle?

Irony, put simply, is a gap between words and their meaning, a space across which speaker and listener exchange a knowing wink. For this knowingness to be mutual, a web of common experiences and beliefs must exist, within which language adopts deeper echoes and associations. In China, however, the Communist Party has made quite clear that there is no commonality but that of the party and its people, and certainly no shared language beyond that handed down by national leaders. The Chinese government has spent decades ensuring that public discourse has remained “public” only in the sense of “government owned.”

As early as 1942, seven years before the founding of the People’s Republic, Chairman Mao was explaining to government leaders and intellectuals that the purpose of art and culture was to serve political ends. But the real damage to the Chinese language was done during the Cultural Revolution, when all music and theater were outlawed except for eight politically correct "Model Operas" and public discourse was reduced to what could be shouted through a PA system. Words were hammered flat into instruments of power and violence. Songs, in particular, were seen as effective tools. One of the most popular, “The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution,” began with this catchy intro:

The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution is good,
It is good,
It is good,
It is good.

Read MoreVia Foreign Policy.

Interesting stuff about Language, The Cultural Revolution, and Humor, of all things. I thought you might enjoy!

rhapsodical:

Jiang Qing, daughter Li Na, and Chairman Mao Zedong1940sClassic image of Jiang Qing and Mao Zedong can be found here.

rhapsodical:

Jiang Qing, daughter Li Na, and Chairman Mao Zedong
1940s

Classic image of Jiang Qing and Mao Zedong can be found here.