artemisdreaming:

1st C. Roman legion Silver Helmet with Facemask, from Homs Syria (ancient Edessa), National Museum of Syria, Damascus  (via:  historyandcivilization.com)

artemisdreaming:

1st C. Roman legion Silver Helmet with Facemask, from Homs Syria (ancient Edessa), National Museum of Syria, Damascus  (via:  historyandcivilization.com)


Burial Mask, Liao Dynasty (Northern China), 1018 or earlier From the Tomb of Princess Chen at Qinglongshanzhen

Asianhistory reads: Gilded Splendor: Treasures of China’s Liao Empire (907-1125). 
Oftentimes I get questions for recommendations on this blog for topics I’m not currently studying. However, this year I have the wonderful opportunity to do an independent study with one of my professors. This gives me quite a bit of freedom in choosing my reading material (It needs to be about decorative arts and material culture, but aside from that, I’m studying what interests me), so I thought I would share in what I’m reading. 
Gilded Splendor is a book I found within my University’s library (It’s upwards of $150 on Amazon used, so I suggest if you want to read it, you search for it at your local library as well). It’s a stunning book on the Liao Empire, covering archaeology, architecture, Buddhist texts, and a detailed catalogue of Liao pieces, as well as maps, developmental benchmarks, and a chronology of Dynastic China. The pictures are often full-page, it’s completely in color, and it’s well put-together and a pleasure to browse through. 
If you don’t have access to this book in a library however, have no fear! They also have a wonderful website to accompany it, where you can view some of the pieces and their essays in both German and English.
Gilded Splendor.  If you have books you could recommend me, feel free to submit them to my ask box! 

Burial Mask, Liao Dynasty (Northern China), 1018 or earlier 
From the Tomb of Princess Chen at Qinglongshanzhen

Asianhistory reads: Gilded Splendor: Treasures of China’s Liao Empire (907-1125)

Oftentimes I get questions for recommendations on this blog for topics I’m not currently studying. However, this year I have the wonderful opportunity to do an independent study with one of my professors. This gives me quite a bit of freedom in choosing my reading material (It needs to be about decorative arts and material culture, but aside from that, I’m studying what interests me), so I thought I would share in what I’m reading. 

Gilded Splendor is a book I found within my University’s library (It’s upwards of $150 on Amazon used, so I suggest if you want to read it, you search for it at your local library as well). It’s a stunning book on the Liao Empire, covering archaeology, architecture, Buddhist texts, and a detailed catalogue of Liao pieces, as well as maps, developmental benchmarks, and a chronology of Dynastic China. The pictures are often full-page, it’s completely in color, and it’s well put-together and a pleasure to browse through. 

If you don’t have access to this book in a library however, have no fear! They also have a wonderful website to accompany it, where you can view some of the pieces and their essays in both German and English.

Gilded Splendor If you have books you could recommend me, feel free to submit them to my ask box! 

afternoonsnoozebutton:

nprfreshair:

Boston.com:







Research scientist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Albert Lin gallops across the steppes of northern Mongolia as he searches for Genghis Khan’s tomb and other archaeological sites. (Photo by Mike Hennig)








Albert Lin is a major badass. He’s an archaeologist who uses groundbreaking technology to figure out what’s below the surface without ever actually breaking the soil.
On top of being incredibly cool, this new, noninvasive approach to archaeology is more culturally respectful and much less destructive.

Also, he’s a pretty good looking guy. Move over, Indiana Jones.

afternoonsnoozebutton:

nprfreshair:

Boston.com:

Research scientist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Albert Lin gallops across the steppes of northern Mongolia as he searches for Genghis Khan’s tomb and other archaeological sites. (Photo by Mike Hennig)

Albert Lin is a major badass. He’s an archaeologist who uses groundbreaking technology to figure out what’s below the surface without ever actually breaking the soil.

On top of being incredibly cool, this new, noninvasive approach to archaeology is more culturally respectful and much less destructive.

image

Also, he’s a pretty good looking guy. Move over, Indiana Jones.

(via not-rubato)

Tay Son dynasty coin unearthed

archaeologicalnews:

HA NOI — The Viet Nam Institute of Archaeology has announced new discoveries unearthed during the recent excavation of Thoai Ngoc Hau and his wives’ tombs, including a coin dating back to the Tay Son dynasty (1778-1802).

Thoai Ngoc Hau (1761-1829), a famous general, helped Nguyen Anh found the Nguyen dynasty (1802-1945). He and his wives were buried in the southern province of An Giang. The excavation of their tombs was carried out on September 19 by local experts. They discovered a number of artefacts buried near the tombs of Chau Thi Te and Truong Thi Met, his first and second wives.

The name on the coin was Minh Duc Thong Bao, minted under the reign of Nguyen Nhac (1788-1793). The discovery in the tomb of the high ranking mandarin’s wife has been seen as a possible breakthrough by archaeologists. Read more.

(via )

archaeology:

Syria’s Looted Past: How Ancient Artifacts Are Being Traded for Guns
Photo: The badly damaged outer gate of Aleppo’s Citadel after government opponents try to blast their way into the ancient fortress.


Abu Khaled knows the worth of things. As a small-time smuggler living along the porous border between Syria and Lebanon, he has dabbled in antiquities as much as the cigarettes, stolen goods and weapons that make up the bulk of his trade. So when a smuggler from Syria brought him a small, alabaster statue of a seated man a few weeks ago, he figured that the carving, most likely looted from one of Syria’s two dozen heritage museums or one of its hundreds of archaeological sites, could be worth a couple thousand dollars in Lebanon’s antiquities black market. So he called his contacts in Beirut. But instead of asking for cash, he asked for something even more valuable: weapons.
“War is good for us,” he says of the community of smugglers that regularly transit the nearby border. “We buy antiquities cheap, and then sell weapons expensively.” That business, he says, is about to get better. Fighters allied with the Free Syrian Army units battling the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad have told him that they are developing an association of diggers dedicated to finding antiquities in order to fund the revolution. “The rebels need weapons, and antiquities are an easy way to buy them,” says Abu Khaled, who goes by his nickname in order to protect his identity.
Criminal activity thrives in chaos, and the theft of antiquities for a rapacious international black market is no exception. Lebanon, Iraq and Afghanistan have all fallen victim to looters during previous wars, and Libya and Egypt, rich in archaeological sites, witnessed several attempts at looting during their more recent uprisings. In the case of Syria, however, the full-blown civil war may do more harm than simply the plundering of its culture. The burgeoning market for this ancient land’s priceless treasures could actually prolong and intensify the conflict, providing a ready supply of goods to be traded for weapons. Furthermore, the ongoing devastation inflicted on the country’s stunning archaeological sites—bullet holes lodged in walls of its ancient Roman cities, the debris of Byzantine churches, early mosques and crusader fortresses—rob Syria of its best chance for a post-conflict economic boom based on tourism, which, until the conflict started 18 months ago, contributed 12% to the national income.

Read more: http://world.time.com/2012/09/12/syrias-looted-past-how-ancient-artifacts-are-being-traded-for-guns/#ixzz26Ih3K6z9

archaeology:

Syria’s Looted Past: How Ancient Artifacts Are Being Traded for Guns

Photo: The badly damaged outer gate of Aleppo’s Citadel after government opponents try to blast their way into the ancient fortress.

Abu Khaled knows the worth of things. As a small-time smuggler living along the porous border between Syria and Lebanon, he has dabbled in antiquities as much as the cigarettes, stolen goods and weapons that make up the bulk of his trade. So when a smuggler from Syria brought him a small, alabaster statue of a seated man a few weeks ago, he figured that the carving, most likely looted from one of Syria’s two dozen heritage museums or one of its hundreds of archaeological sites, could be worth a couple thousand dollars in Lebanon’s antiquities black market. So he called his contacts in Beirut. But instead of asking for cash, he asked for something even more valuable: weapons.

“War is good for us,” he says of the community of smugglers that regularly transit the nearby border. “We buy antiquities cheap, and then sell weapons expensively.” That business, he says, is about to get better. Fighters allied with the Free Syrian Army units battling the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad have told him that they are developing an association of diggers dedicated to finding antiquities in order to fund the revolution. “The rebels need weapons, and antiquities are an easy way to buy them,” says Abu Khaled, who goes by his nickname in order to protect his identity.

Criminal activity thrives in chaos, and the theft of antiquities for a rapacious international black market is no exception. Lebanon, Iraq and Afghanistan have all fallen victim to looters during previous wars, and Libya and Egypt, rich in archaeological sites, witnessed several attempts at looting during their more recent uprisings. In the case of Syria, however, the full-blown civil war may do more harm than simply the plundering of its culture. The burgeoning market for this ancient land’s priceless treasures could actually prolong and intensify the conflict, providing a ready supply of goods to be traded for weapons. Furthermore, the ongoing devastation inflicted on the country’s stunning archaeological sites—bullet holes lodged in walls of its ancient Roman cities, the debris of Byzantine churches, early mosques and crusader fortresses—rob Syria of its best chance for a post-conflict economic boom based on tourism, which, until the conflict started 18 months ago, contributed 12% to the national income.


Read more: http://world.time.com/2012/09/12/syrias-looted-past-how-ancient-artifacts-are-being-traded-for-guns/#ixzz26Ih3K6z9


ancientart:

Sumerian Temple Hymn, baked clay, circa between 1800 and 1600 BC (Old Babylonian), currently located at the Walters Art Museum.

This tablet, inscribed on all four sides, is one of the best preserved copies of the Sumerian hymn to the temple at Kesh. The popular hymn, written in praise of the temple built for the mother-goddess Nintu in the city of Kesh in southern Mesopotamia, describes the temple in both physical and heavenly terms.

ancientart:

Sumerian Temple Hymn, baked clay, circa between 1800 and 1600 BC (Old Babylonian), currently located at the Walters Art Museum.

This tablet, inscribed on all four sides, is one of the best preserved copies of the Sumerian hymn to the temple at Kesh. The popular hymn, written in praise of the temple built for the mother-goddess Nintu in the city of Kesh in southern Mesopotamia, describes the temple in both physical and heavenly terms.

ancientart:

Ancient Assyrian relief, Lamassu, originally from the Palace of Sargon II, currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

ancientart:

Ancient Assyrian relief, Lamassu, originally from the Palace of Sargon II, currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Archaeologists find China’s first imperial palace

archaeologicalnews:

Beijing - Chinese archaeologists have discovered the remains of the country’s oldest imperial palace, which dates back 3,700 years and is linked to the ancient Xia Dynasty, which many researchers long considered to be merely the stuff of legend.

The remains of the palace are at the Erlitou Bronze Age site in the country’s north-central Henan province, according to the People’s Daily. Archaeologists discovered the rammed-earth foundation, with at least three courtyards. The palace covers a total area of more than 2,100 square meters.

Head of the archaeological team at the site and director of the Department of the Xia-Shang-Zhou Archaeology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xu Hong, said:

“The Erlitou palace complex is an amazing discovery, and is the earliest imperial palace in China.” Read more.
tammuz:

Statue of a bearded male worshiper from Ur’s Early Dynastic Era (2650-2550 BC). The Oriental Institute Museum of the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Statue of a bearded male worshiper from Ur’s Early Dynastic Era (2650-2550 BC). The Oriental Institute Museum of the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

culturalsecurity:

Ancient Life-Size Lion Statues Baffle Scientists
Two sculptures of life-size lions, each weighing about 5 tons in antiquity, have been discovered in what is now Turkey, with archaeologists perplexed over what the granite cats were used for.
One idea is that the statues, created between 1400 and 1200 B.C., were meant to be part of a monument for a sacred water spring, the researchers said.
The lifelike lions were created by the Hittites who controlled a vast empire in the region at a time when the Asiatic lion roamed the foothills of Turkey. 
“The lions are prowling forward, their heads slightly lowered; the tops of their heads are barely higher than the napes,” write Geoffrey Summers, of the Middle East Technical University, and researcher Erol Ozen in an article published in the most recent edition of the American Journal of Archaeology. Read more
For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

culturalsecurity:

Ancient Life-Size Lion Statues Baffle Scientists

Two sculptures of life-size lions, each weighing about 5 tons in antiquity, have been discovered in what is now Turkey, with archaeologists perplexed over what the granite cats were used for.

One idea is that the statues, created between 1400 and 1200 B.C., were meant to be part of a monument for a sacred water spring, the researchers said.

The lifelike lions were created by the Hittites who controlled a vast empire in the region at a time when the Asiatic lion roamed the foothills of Turkey. 

“The lions are prowling forward, their heads slightly lowered; the tops of their heads are barely higher than the napes,” write Geoffrey Summers, of the Middle East Technical University, and researcher Erol Ozen in an article published in the most recent edition of the American Journal of Archaeology. Read more

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm