rmanyc:

Happy Uthradom! Vamana as Tri-vikrama (victor of the three worlds) triumphing over Bali(Dwarf Incarnation of Vishnu (Vamana- Trivikrama), Painting; Watercolor, Opaque watercolor on paper, Made in Nepal. via LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art. )

rmanyc:

Happy Uthradom! 
Vamana as Tri-vikrama (victor of the three worlds) triumphing over Bali
(Dwarf Incarnation of Vishnu (Vamana- Trivikrama), Painting; Watercolor, Opaque watercolor on paper, Made in Nepal. via LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art. )

notbrianna:

Nepalese woman road builder, half-length portrait, standing, facing front, Sikkim
1965 April.

notbrianna:

Nepalese woman road builder, half-length portrait, standing, facing front, Sikkim

1965 April.

southasianhistory:

Kirats were indigenous people of Mongolian origin with stout and short stature, high cheekbones, flat noses, narrow black eyes and thin moustaches and beards. They were brave and doughty warriors and very deft archers. Before the advent of the Kirats, there were Ahir and Abhir rule in the valley. Yalambar, the first Kirat King, overthrew the last king of Abhir dynasty Bhuban Shima. Thus after defeating the last ruler of Abhir dynasty, Yalambar laid the foundation of the Kirat dynasty that lasted for about 1225 years.
When Kirats occupied the valley, they made Matatirtha their capital. The Kirat kingdom during the rule of Yalambar had extended to Tista in the East and Trisidi in the West. It is said Yalambar had gone to witness the battle of Mahabharata between the Pandavas and the Kauravas. He was so brave and powerful that Lord Krishna beheaded him prior to the battle suspecting he might fight for the Kauravas. The Kirats revere him as God King these days.In the chronicle of Banasawali William Kirk Patrick mentions that the Kirat rule existed from about 1500 BC to 300 BC. During this long period altogether 29 Kirat Kings ruled over the country. 
It was during the rule of Jitedasti, the 7th Kirat king; Lord Gautam Buddha had visited the valley with his several disciples. He visited holy places of Swayambhu, guheswari etc and preached his religious gospels. Kirats of the valley refused to follow his doctrine but welcomed Lord Buddha and his disciples. It is also said that King Jitedasti had helped the Pandavas in the battle of Mahabharata. It shows, of course, a historical anachronism because according to another legend, the battle Mahabharata had taken place during the resigm of King Yalambar.
During the rule of 14th Kirat King Sthunko about 2250 Bc, the Indian Emperor Ashok had his inspections engraved on rocks and a stone-pillar. The pillar known as Ahok-pillar still stands. This historical monument was unknown to the world until Dr. Fuher discovered it in December 1985. Nepal Govt. has prepared a master plan to protect and develop Lumbini region as religious tourism destination.
Emperor Ashok also came to the Kathmandu Valley later. The daughter princess Charumati accompanied him. During his stay in the valley, he had built four stupas in four directions and one in the centre of Patan. These monuments speak of the historical fact of Ashok’s visit to the valley. Another fact is he had arranged his daughter Charumati’s marriage with a local young prince named Devpal. Prince Devpal and his consort Charumati lived at Chabahil near Pashupati area. Later Charumati had built the touss of Devpatan after the death of her husband in his memory. Charumati who had later on become a nun herself also got erected a convent where she resided and practiced Lord Buddha’s doctrine.
When the 28th Kirat King Patuka was ruling in the valley, the Sombanshi ruler attacked his regime many times from the west. Although he successfully repelled their attacks, he was forced to move to Shankhamul from gokarna. He had built a royal palace called “Patuka” there for him. The ‘Patuka’ palace is no more to be seen now except its ruins in the form of mound. Patuka had changed Shankhamul into a beautiful town. The last King of the Kirat dynasty was Gasti. He proved to be a weak ruler and was overthrown by the Sombanshi ruler Nimisha. It brought to the end of the powerful Kirat dynasty that had lasted for about 1225 years.
After their defeat, Kirats moved to the Eastern hills of Nepal and settled down divided into small principalities. Their settlements were divided into there regions, i.e. ‘Wallokirat’ that lied to the East of the Kathmandu, ‘Majkirat’ or Central Kirat region and ‘Pallokirat’ that lied to the far East of the Kathmandu valley. These regions are still heavily populated by Kirats. (via 1 and 2)

southasianhistory:

Kirats were indigenous people of Mongolian origin with stout and short stature, high cheekbones, flat noses, narrow black eyes and thin moustaches and beards. They were brave and doughty warriors and very deft archers. Before the advent of the Kirats, there were Ahir and Abhir rule in the valley. Yalambar, the first Kirat King, overthrew the last king of Abhir dynasty Bhuban Shima. Thus after defeating the last ruler of Abhir dynasty, Yalambar laid the foundation of the Kirat dynasty that lasted for about 1225 years.

When Kirats occupied the valley, they made Matatirtha their capital. The Kirat kingdom during the rule of Yalambar had extended to Tista in the East and Trisidi in the West. It is said Yalambar had gone to witness the battle of Mahabharata between the Pandavas and the Kauravas. He was so brave and powerful that Lord Krishna beheaded him prior to the battle suspecting he might fight for the Kauravas. The Kirats revere him as God King these days.In the chronicle of Banasawali William Kirk Patrick mentions that the Kirat rule existed from about 1500 BC to 300 BC. During this long period altogether 29 Kirat Kings ruled over the country. 

It was during the rule of Jitedasti, the 7th Kirat king; Lord Gautam Buddha had visited the valley with his several disciples. He visited holy places of Swayambhu, guheswari etc and preached his religious gospels. Kirats of the valley refused to follow his doctrine but welcomed Lord Buddha and his disciples. It is also said that King Jitedasti had helped the Pandavas in the battle of Mahabharata. It shows, of course, a historical anachronism because according to another legend, the battle Mahabharata had taken place during the resigm of King Yalambar.

During the rule of 14th Kirat King Sthunko about 2250 Bc, the Indian Emperor Ashok had his inspections engraved on rocks and a stone-pillar. The pillar known as Ahok-pillar still stands. This historical monument was unknown to the world until Dr. Fuher discovered it in December 1985. Nepal Govt. has prepared a master plan to protect and develop Lumbini region as religious tourism destination.

Emperor Ashok also came to the Kathmandu Valley later. The daughter princess Charumati accompanied him. During his stay in the valley, he had built four stupas in four directions and one in the centre of Patan. These monuments speak of the historical fact of Ashok’s visit to the valley. Another fact is he had arranged his daughter Charumati’s marriage with a local young prince named Devpal. Prince Devpal and his consort Charumati lived at Chabahil near Pashupati area. Later Charumati had built the touss of Devpatan after the death of her husband in his memory. Charumati who had later on become a nun herself also got erected a convent where she resided and practiced Lord Buddha’s doctrine.

When the 28th Kirat King Patuka was ruling in the valley, the Sombanshi ruler attacked his regime many times from the west. Although he successfully repelled their attacks, he was forced to move to Shankhamul from gokarna. He had built a royal palace called “Patuka” there for him. The ‘Patuka’ palace is no more to be seen now except its ruins in the form of mound. Patuka had changed Shankhamul into a beautiful town. The last King of the Kirat dynasty was Gasti. He proved to be a weak ruler and was overthrown by the Sombanshi ruler Nimisha. It brought to the end of the powerful Kirat dynasty that had lasted for about 1225 years.

After their defeat, Kirats moved to the Eastern hills of Nepal and settled down divided into small principalities. Their settlements were divided into there regions, i.e. ‘Wallokirat’ that lied to the East of the Kathmandu, ‘Majkirat’ or Central Kirat region and ‘Pallokirat’ that lied to the far East of the Kathmandu valley. These regions are still heavily populated by Kirats. (via 1 and 2)

(Source: , via beyondvictoriana)

universalbeauty:

Vintage photo of Nepalese woman, 1910 (source)

universalbeauty:

Vintage photo of Nepalese woman, 1910 (source)

(via beyondvictoriana)

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Ritual helmet
Place of origin: Nepal
Date: 1677
Materials and Techniques: Gilt copper, set with stones
Gallery notes: Elaborate crowns of this type are worn by Vajracaryas, Buddhist priests when officiating at religious ceremonies in Nepal. Vajracarya, “master of the thunderbolt”, is both a caste and family name indicating those entitled to perform priestly functions. They command the highest rank in the Buddhist community, the equivalent of Brahmins in the Hindu context. They typically use both a vajra (thunderbolt sceptre) and ghanta (ritual bell) in these rituals. A painted Nepalese manuscript cover dated 1532 depicts such a crowned Vajracarya engaged in ritual on behalf of a donor and his family at a temple stupa; he is depicted holding both vajra and ghanta and seated before a fire altar and assorted ritual utensils, including an offering dish, mirror and miniature chaityas (stupas). The ritual crown depicted bears close comparison to the V&A example, with its forehead diadem and elaborate superstructure, and the ear-like pendants.
This crown has individually cast medallions depicting Bodhisattvas positioned around the dome, with Vairocana in the centre; each is framed within an elaborate foliate medallion. The crown is surmounted by a five-pronged half-vajra. A dated inscription (Nepal Samvat 797) invokes Vajrasattva, the supreme deity of the vajra sect. A number of these crowns have survived, but this example is the finest and most complete.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Ritual helmet

Place of origin: Nepal

Date: 1677

Materials and Techniques: Gilt copper, set with stones

Gallery notes: Elaborate crowns of this type are worn by Vajracaryas, Buddhist priests when officiating at religious ceremonies in Nepal. Vajracarya, “master of the thunderbolt”, is both a caste and family name indicating those entitled to perform priestly functions. They command the highest rank in the Buddhist community, the equivalent of Brahmins in the Hindu context. They typically use both a vajra (thunderbolt sceptre) and ghanta (ritual bell) in these rituals. A painted Nepalese manuscript cover dated 1532 depicts such a crowned Vajracarya engaged in ritual on behalf of a donor and his family at a temple stupa; he is depicted holding both vajra and ghanta and seated before a fire altar and assorted ritual utensils, including an offering dish, mirror and miniature chaityas (stupas). The ritual crown depicted bears close comparison to the V&A example, with its forehead diadem and elaborate superstructure, and the ear-like pendants.

This crown has individually cast medallions depicting Bodhisattvas positioned around the dome, with Vairocana in the centre; each is framed within an elaborate foliate medallion. The crown is surmounted by a five-pronged half-vajra. A dated inscription (Nepal Samvat 797) invokes Vajrasattva, the supreme deity of the vajra sect. A number of these crowns have survived, but this example is the finest and most complete.

(via beyondvictoriana)

medievalthedas:


Nrtyadevi, Goddess of Dance Mid- 15th century Nepal, probably Bhaktapur, Newar culture Wood with polychrome decoration 43 1/2 x 12 1/2 x 9 inches (110.5 x 31.8 x 22.9 cm) Purchased with the Stella Kramrisch Fund, 2000 

Nrtyadevi, Goddess of Dance, stands in a classic Nepalese dance posture-legs crossed, torso swaying, hands poised in graceful, reassuring gestures. Her costume displays some of the hallmarks of Malla fashion. Densely patterned floral medallions cover her form-fitting shirt, while a striped skirt clings to her legs. Draped across her thighs is a flowery sash, and three pendants that appear frozen in mid-swing hang from her waistband. A beaded headdress supports her heavy disk-and-peacock earrings. Ornate bead and link necklaces, bracelets, armlets, and anklets complete her outfit. Such textiles and jewelry reflect the wealth accumulated in Nepal from trade between Tibet and India during the Malla period.

Marvels of the Malla Period

medievalthedas:

Nrtyadevi, Goddess of Dance
Mid- 15th century
Nepal, probably Bhaktapur, Newar culture
Wood with polychrome decoration
43 1/2 x 12 1/2 x 9 inches (110.5 x 31.8 x 22.9 cm)
Purchased with the Stella Kramrisch Fund, 2000 


Nrtyadevi, Goddess of Dance, stands in a classic Nepalese dance posture-legs crossed, torso swaying, hands poised in graceful, reassuring gestures. Her costume displays some of the hallmarks of Malla fashion. Densely patterned floral medallions cover her form-fitting shirt, while a striped skirt clings to her legs. Draped across her thighs is a flowery sash, and three pendants that appear frozen in mid-swing hang from her waistband. A beaded headdress supports her heavy disk-and-peacock earrings. Ornate bead and link necklaces, bracelets, armlets, and anklets complete her outfit. Such textiles and jewelry reflect the wealth accumulated in Nepal from trade between Tibet and India during the Malla period.

Marvels of the Malla Period

(Source: mirousworlds)

centuriespast:

 
A Tantric Yogin
Nepalese
12th Century
Walters Museum

centuriespast:

A Tantric Yogin

Nepalese

12th Century

Walters Museum

The Goddess Durga as Slayer of the Buffalo-Demon Mahisha (Mahishasuramardini), 14th–15th centuryNepalGilt copper alloy, inlaid with semiprecious stones 
This is one  of the finest Nepali depictions of Durga known. The eighteen-armed Hindu  goddess Durga, an aspect of the Great Goddess Devi, is depicted in the  act of slaying the demon Mahisha. After the gods had been defeated in  battle by the all-powerful Mahisha, they created Durga to serve as their  champion and turned over to her their weapons. With the force of the  collective might transferred by the gods to her, Durga slays the demon,  who had transformed himself into a ferocious buffalo. Originally, this  Durga was part of a larger ensemble. She stood on the back of the  buffalo-demon, supported on a pedestal.
Source:  Goddess  Durga as Slayer of the Buffalo-Demon Mahisha (Mahishasuramardini), The  [Nepal] (1986.498) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The  Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Goddess Durga as Slayer of the Buffalo-Demon Mahisha (Mahishasuramardini), 14th–15th century
Nepal
Gilt copper alloy, inlaid with semiprecious stones

This is one of the finest Nepali depictions of Durga known. The eighteen-armed Hindu goddess Durga, an aspect of the Great Goddess Devi, is depicted in the act of slaying the demon Mahisha. After the gods had been defeated in battle by the all-powerful Mahisha, they created Durga to serve as their champion and turned over to her their weapons. With the force of the collective might transferred by the gods to her, Durga slays the demon, who had transformed himself into a ferocious buffalo. Originally, this Durga was part of a larger ensemble. She stood on the back of the buffalo-demon, supported on a pedestal.


Source: Goddess Durga as Slayer of the Buffalo-Demon Mahisha (Mahishasuramardini), The [Nepal] (1986.498) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

centuriespast:

Yungdron Dorje Pal (1284–1365) subduing a wrathful demon while attended by a meditation deity, Mahakala and other monks.
Workshop Unknown, Tibet or Nepal
ink and gouache on cotton
UMMA

centuriespast:

Yungdron Dorje Pal (1284–1365) subduing a wrathful demon while attended by a meditation deity, Mahakala and other monks.

Workshop Unknown, Tibet or Nepal

ink and gouache on cotton

UMMA