asiasociety:

Photos: ‘Bishan Project’ Aims to Reinvent, Yet Preserve, China’s Rural Identity

Grantees of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Sun Yunfan and Leah Thompson use up-to-the-minute technology to document the changes facing a traditional Chinese village in an era of urbanization and globalization.

Read the full story here.

fromthefloatingworld:

Photo from The Foundations of Japan: Notes Made During Journeys Of 6,000 Miles In The Rural Districts As A Basis For A Sounder Knowledge Of The Japanese People, by J.W. Robertson Scott, published 1922

fromthefloatingworld:

Photo from The Foundations of Japan: Notes Made During Journeys Of 6,000 Miles In The Rural Districts As A Basis For A Sounder Knowledge Of The Japanese People, by J.W. Robertson Scott, published 1922

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

collectivehistory:

Afghanistan in the 1950s and 1960s, The Atlantic

Picture taken in 1962 at the Faculty of Medicine in Kabul of two Afghan medicine students listening to their professor (at right) as they examine a plaster cast showing a part of a human body.

Afghan man leading laden camels and donkeys through an arid, rocky landscape, in November, 1959.

Afghan women, men, and child in traditional dress ride in a cart through an arid, rocky landscape, November, 1959.

Women, wearing traditional burqas and Persian slippers, walk alongside men, cars and horse carts, in a street in Kabul, in 1951. At the time, this street was one of only three paved streets in the capital city.

A modern traffic light stands incongruously amid burqa-clad women sitting on a Kabul street corner with their backs to their men on May 25, 1964.

Scene inside the modern new government printing plant in Kabul on June 9, 1966, which houses Kabul Times.

Afghan boys, men, and women, some in bare feet, shop at a marketplace in Kabul, Afghanistan, in May of 1964. [x]

(via )

vintageindianclothing:

Family, Maharashtra-11
Click for larger view.
Titled a “Group of Mahomedans” but fairly obviously a family. Dress is quite similar across Maharashtra with variations in castes/religious denominations.  Lots of saris, a woman in a half-sari, second from left. A few variegated cholis made from separate pieces of cloth. The way the dupatta is worn by the standing girl, extreme left, pops up now and then in vintage pics.
[X]
Embroidered velvet caps and turbans (which were often specific to region, caste and religion) on men are also seen often in the late 19th century/early 20th century. And while kurtas, achkans and long coats are common across castes/religions, these are combined with chudidars or paijamas rather than the pleated dhoti amongst Muslim men.

vintageindianclothing:

Family, Maharashtra-11

Click for larger view.

Titled a “Group of Mahomedans” but fairly obviously a family. Dress is quite similar across Maharashtra with variations in castes/religious denominations.  Lots of saris, a woman in a half-sari, second from left. A few variegated cholis made from separate pieces of cloth. The way the dupatta is worn by the standing girl, extreme left, pops up now and then in vintage pics.

[X]

Embroidered velvet caps and turbans (which were often specific to region, caste and religion) on men are also seen often in the late 19th century/early 20th century. And while kurtas, achkans and long coats are common across castes/religions, these are combined with chudidars or paijamas rather than the pleated dhoti amongst Muslim men.

(Source: columbia.edu, via beyondvictoriana)

asiasociety:

Photo of the Day: Tribal Beauties in the Philippines
A group of women celebrate the Dinagyang Festival that honors Santo Niño and the arrival of Malay tribes in Panay in Iloilo, Philippines on January 27, 2013. (Eduardo Seastres)
Want to see your images in our ‘Photo of the Day’ posts? Find out how.

asiasociety:

Photo of the Day: Tribal Beauties in the Philippines

A group of women celebrate the Dinagyang Festival that honors Santo Niño and the arrival of Malay tribes in Panay in Iloilo, Philippines on January 27, 2013. (Eduardo Seastres)

Want to see your images in our ‘Photo of the Day’ posts? Find out how.

centuriespast:

Artist Unknown
UNTITLED [INDIAN WOMAN IN NATIVE DRESS] , C. 1875
Albumen print
Akron Art Museum

centuriespast:

Artist Unknown

UNTITLED [INDIAN WOMAN IN NATIVE DRESS] , C. 1875

Albumen print

Akron Art Museum

gunsandposes:

Herat, Afghanistan, 1992, after years of Soviet bombardment. Photo by Steve McCurry. (Magnum)

gunsandposes:

Herat, Afghanistan, 1992, after years of Soviet bombardment. Photo by Steve McCurry. (Magnum)

(via humanoidhistory)

natgeofound:

To spread political views, soldiers release balloons holding leaflets in Taiwan, January 1969.Photograph by Frank and Helen Schreider, National Geographic

natgeofound:

To spread political views, soldiers release balloons holding leaflets in Taiwan, January 1969.Photograph by Frank and Helen Schreider, National Geographic

liquidfunk:

Rainbow Runners and Rice Cakes: on the eve of my birthday(09/12) after breakfast go to CSUN at 10 AM at Oviatt Library? See below. Happy crescent moon night.
Archiving the Unspeakable: Silence, Memory, and the Photographic Record in Cambodia 
Thursday, September 12 at 10:00 amFerman Presentation RoomGarden Library, CSUN Oviatt Library
Abstract: The Khmer Rouge ruled Cambodia for less than four years. In their brief but devastating rule, approximately 1.7 million people died from untreated disease, starvation, and execution. For many, the regime’s brutality has come to be symbolized by a series of black-and-white mug shots taken at the notorious Tuol Sleng prison, where thousands of “enemies of the state” were tortured before being sent to the Killing Fields. Based on a soon-to-be published book, this talk will trace the social life of these photographs through the lens of archival studies, arguing that these images are records first and foremost and that archival institutions are playing a key role in preserving and providing context to these records. From their creation as administrative records, to their transformation into museum displays, archival collections, and databases, and their ongoing uses by Cambodians to bear witness to the regime, the mug shots are agents in an ongoing drama of unimaginable human suffering. While we are confronted by the unbearably heavy silence of the soon-to-be-dead victims looking back at us in the photographs, archivists, survivors, and victims’ family members are interrupting this silence by strategically deploying these records in legal testimonies, documentary films, and new photographs of Cambodians and foreign tourists looking at them, creating a new archive of responses to the Khmer Rouge. Through the use of the Tuol Sleng photographs, Cambodians are supplanting a narrative of victimhood with a narrative of witnessing, transforming records that document an unspeakably violent past into agents of social change for the future. 

Michelle Caswell is Assistant Professor of Archival Studies in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA, where she is also an affiliated faculty member with the Center for Southeast Asian Studies. She holds a PhD in Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an MLIS in archival administration from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a master’s degree in theological studies focusing on Asian religions from Harvard University. Her articles on archives, communities, and social justice have appeared in Archival Science, Archivaria, American Archivist, The Journal of Documentation, InterActions, Libri, First Monday, and numerous edited volumes. She is also the co-founder and a board member of the South Asian American Digital Archive (http://www.saadigitalarchive.org).  http://library.csun.edu/blogs/goingson/archiving-the-unspeakable/

liquidfunk:

Rainbow Runners and Rice Cakes: on the eve of my birthday(09/12) after breakfast go to CSUN at 10 AM at Oviatt Library? See below. Happy crescent moon night.

Archiving the Unspeakable: Silence, Memory, and the Photographic Record in Cambodia

Thursday, September 12 at 10:00 am
Ferman Presentation Room
Garden Library, CSUN Oviatt Library

Abstract: The Khmer Rouge ruled Cambodia for less than four years. In their brief but devastating rule, approximately 1.7 million people died from untreated disease, starvation, and execution. For many, the regime’s brutality has come to be symbolized by a series of black-and-white mug shots taken at the notorious Tuol Sleng prison, where thousands of “enemies of the state” were tortured before being sent to the Killing Fields. Based on a soon-to-be published book, this talk will trace the social life of these photographs through the lens of archival studies, arguing that these images are records first and foremost and that archival institutions are playing a key role in preserving and providing context to these records. From their creation as administrative records, to their transformation into museum displays, archival collections, and databases, and their ongoing uses by Cambodians to bear witness to the regime, the mug shots are agents in an ongoing drama of unimaginable human suffering. While we are confronted by the unbearably heavy silence of the soon-to-be-dead victims looking back at us in the photographs, archivists, survivors, and victims’ family members are interrupting this silence by strategically deploying these records in legal testimonies, documentary films, and new photographs of Cambodians and foreign tourists looking at them, creating a new archive of responses to the Khmer Rouge. Through the use of the Tuol Sleng photographs, Cambodians are supplanting a narrative of victimhood with a narrative of witnessing, transforming records that document an unspeakably violent past into agents of social change for the future.

Michelle Caswell is Assistant Professor of Archival Studies in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA, where she is also an affiliated faculty member with the Center for Southeast Asian Studies. She holds a PhD in Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an MLIS in archival administration from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a master’s degree in theological studies focusing on Asian religions from Harvard University. Her articles on archives, communities, and social justice have appeared in Archival Science, Archivaria, American Archivist, The Journal of Documentation, InterActions, Libri, First Monday, and numerous edited volumes. She is also the co-founder and a board member of the South Asian American Digital Archive (http://www.saadigitalarchive.org).  http://library.csun.edu/blogs/goingson/archiving-the-unspeakable/

collectivehistory:

An estimated 95,000 Iranian child soldiers were killed during the Iran–Iraq War.

collectivehistory:

An estimated 95,000 Iranian child soldiers were killed during the Iran–Iraq War.

(Source: collective-history, via collectivehistory-deactivated20)