Over the past 25 years, Muslim majorities have elected five women as heads of state in the Muslim world (Tansu Ciller in Turkey, Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan, Hasina Wajed and Khaleda Zia in Bangladesh, and Megawati Sukarnoputri in Indonesia). Notwithstanding our verbiage of female empowerment and liberation, we have yet to elect a single woman as president in the US. The Quran is the only sacred text that devotes an entire chapter to the rights of women. In fact, women in Europe could not inherit property independent of their husbands up until the 18th century. Islam over 1,400 years ago gave women the rights of inheritance, work, and hold public office. But the misperception of a Muslim woman that is veiled and oppressed guides our thinking.

- Dr. Ali M. Nizamuddin is a ISPU Fellow and an associate professor of political science at the University of Illinois Springfield. (via ffeimo)

(via optimistic-red-velvet-walrus)

missturdle:

thatswhatshesaidquotes:

Help to save the Women of Color categories on Wikipedia!
I created two categories for women of color (African American women and Hispanic and Latino American women), and intended to create more, when one day I went to Wikipedia and found that someone had nominated them for deletion. I found that they were trying to use a rule Wikipedia has for creating gendered categories for the reason for deletion. That is, that a category for one gender should not be created unless it relates to the topic.
But what I don’t really understand is how this person, and now another person who has jumped on the bandwagon who agrees thinks, is how it doesn’t relate to the topic. Why?
Here’s why:
I created these categories for several reasons.
Research. This is what an encyclopedia is for, right? It should be easier to conduct research for women’s history if we can look for women of color in one place. When they are scattered around in different areas, research is less simplified.
Respect. Women of color in each ethnicity deserve a category of their own and deserve to be recognized.
Future use. Girls and younger women will be able to see the achievements of these women.
How can you help?
Please go here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Categories_for_discussion/Log/2011_July_11#Category:African_American_women
and follow the directions in the picture above.
As per the directions you type
*”’Keep”’(and type your reason to keep here, remove the parenthesis.)
Please do this if you wish to recognize women of color on Wikipedia.

Commented. Don’t remember my wikiuser id/pw but this is so important guys.
I’d kill for some of these catagories!

GUYS. I’m not going to use this blog as a soapbox for every social issue ever, but it would be really nice if y’all would comment with “keep” to the African American Women category. Why? Because if we can’t get an African American Women category, then we can’t get a Latina/Hispanic American Women Catagory and we can’t get an Asian American Women category and I’m sure the Americans (and American History buffs/Diaspora buffs/Women’s History Buffs) could really use a category like this.
So, um, sign please? That’s What She Said Quotes is an awesome blog and this is an awesomely helpful thing.

missturdle:

thatswhatshesaidquotes:

Help to save the Women of Color categories on Wikipedia!

I created two categories for women of color (African American women and Hispanic and Latino American women), and intended to create more, when one day I went to Wikipedia and found that someone had nominated them for deletion. I found that they were trying to use a rule Wikipedia has for creating gendered categories for the reason for deletion. That is, that a category for one gender should not be created unless it relates to the topic.

But what I don’t really understand is how this person, and now another person who has jumped on the bandwagon who agrees thinks, is how it doesn’t relate to the topic. Why?

Here’s why:

I created these categories for several reasons.

  1. Research. This is what an encyclopedia is for, right? It should be easier to conduct research for women’s history if we can look for women of color in one place. When they are scattered around in different areas, research is less simplified.
  2. Respect. Women of color in each ethnicity deserve a category of their own and deserve to be recognized.
  3. Future use. Girls and younger women will be able to see the achievements of these women.

How can you help?

Please go here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Categories_for_discussion/Log/2011_July_11#Category:African_American_women

and follow the directions in the picture above.

As per the directions you type

*”’Keep”’(and type your reason to keep here, remove the parenthesis.)

Please do this if you wish to recognize women of color on Wikipedia.

Commented. Don’t remember my wikiuser id/pw but this is so important guys.

I’d kill for some of these catagories!

GUYS. I’m not going to use this blog as a soapbox for every social issue ever, but it would be really nice if y’all would comment with “keep” to the African American Women category. Why? Because if we can’t get an African American Women category, then we can’t get a Latina/Hispanic American Women Catagory and we can’t get an Asian American Women category and I’m sure the Americans (and American History buffs/Diaspora buffs/Women’s History Buffs) could really use a category like this.

So, um, sign please? That’s What She Said Quotes is an awesome blog and this is an awesomely helpful thing.

(via )

Writing Resources - Eff Yeah Asian History Edition

I realized that I had more to add to the last thing I just reblogged so here goes. I know that some people may need to brush up on their cross-cultural writing, and others may be writing their own cultures and just in need of things to work with. Either way, here’s a collection of resources I believe will be of use to writers, those involved in fandom at large, anyone interested, and anti-racists and allies:

And, there you go! Whew.

 

softfilm:

Amy Wang, Shanghai society girl and fashion designer (late 1930s)
Read her story and see more pics at her granddaughter Natalie Zee Drieu’s blog Coquette.

softfilm:

Amy Wang, Shanghai society girl and fashion designer (late 1930s)

Read her story and see more pics at her granddaughter Natalie Zee Drieu’s blog Coquette.

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)